Leadership is multifaceted. There are many things that the leader needs to pay careful attention to. He has to put together many components to make up the bigger picture.

The leader is a ‘convergence point’ of sort. There is a lot of information that is often vying for his attention. And that leader’s success depends on how well he understands and interprets the implications.

The leader and  the team or organization’s success hangs in the balance of him not getting stuck on one aspect of his leadership.

The really successful leaders know that spending more time in one area has implications on other areas, and sometimes in a detrimental way.

Thus, as a leader, you need to have “intentional Attention Deficit Disorder‘ (A.D.D.) in your leading. Your attention is one of the greatest resources you have, don’t spend it all in one area…

Resist the pressure to give all areas of your leadership or organisation equal attention, it is counterproductive

Success comes most readily to those who reject balance, who instead pursue strategies that are intentionally imbalanced – Marcus Buckingham

Balance will look different for every leader.

Determining which things will have your greatest and or shortest attention is important to the success of your enterprise

‘Perfect balance’ is a myth and counterproductive. Not everything you do deserves the same amount of time, attention and resources. Thus, balance is distributing your attention and resources in varying degrees as pertinent to each area and how it fits in to the big picture.

So, successful leaders have A.D.D. Your thoughts?

image by Hey Paul Studios | cc

Published by Blessing Mpofu

just a guy changing the world

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  1. very true… many leaders buckle because of feeling they need to give equal attention to everything!

    1. yes… there is need to apportion time, attention and other resources in proportion to their importance and not necessarily equally… thanks Susan!

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